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  • A Long Journey

    A Long Journey

    Landing safely in Canada in 2014 was unbelievable happiness for B. The 10 years of fleeing had finally opened to a future. The journey began in Ethiopia and led him to Tanzania where he was educated and where he met and married his wife.

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  • Immigrants Deserve to Be Heard

    Immigrants Deserve to Be Heard

    According to two refugees, Lesotho is a peaceful country despite the instability among the political leaders. These men appreciate the Lesotho government for giving them shelter, though the small stipend they have been receiving is cut out since January 2015, this without any explanation.

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  • Peruvian Immigrant

    Peruvian Immigrant

    Lima, Peru – Julie (19, Dominican Republic) married Henry (25, Peru) and returned with him to his family home after an internet courtship and personal visit. Following his family’s rejection he became verbally abusive which turned into physical abuse after their son was born.

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  • The Power of Language

    The Power of Language

    Jorge’s family lived off the land raising corn, vegetables and livestock in rural Mexico. Traveling with his burro up a mountainside to harvest corn, left him little time for school, but he completed sixth grade. Gradually, members of his family traveled north seeking a better life.

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  • Young Refugees

    Young Refugees

    Tacoma, WA - Antonio grew up in El Salvador. His father abandoned him, his mom and his baby sister shortly after his sister was born. When Antonio was 16 years old, the “Maras” (gangs) began threatening him. One day as he was leaving school, members of the gang cornered him and took his phone.

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Peruvian Immigrant

Lima, Peru – Julie (19, Dominican Republic) married Henry (25, Peru) and returned with him to his family home after an internet courtship and personal visit. Following his family’s rejection he became verbally abusive which turned into physical abuse after their son was born.

Public abuse led to a legal complaint and she was assisted by the services of the Ministry of the Mujer. Henry and his family demanded she withdraw the complaint or return to her home, but without her baby. She wants to return to the Dominican Republic, but cannot without a lengthy and costly legal process to take her child with her. Julie’s mother petitioned the assistance of the Embassies who advised her of the need of a lawyer to file for divorce, another lengthy process. Now, living with her child in the Refugee House, Julie is without friends and resources to pay for their living expenses, unable to work to complete the legal processes despite the law requiring the Peruvian father to give assistance for the child.

This situation is not unique. Currently there is another woman (Columbiana) and child living in the Refugee House. They and other young women are caught in this vicious circle.

Reflection “In this world of globalization we have fallen into a globalization of indifference. We are accustomed to the suffering of others, it doesn’t concern us, it’s none of our business. … The globalization of indifference makes us all ‘unnamed’, leaders without names and without faces,”said the Pope. And he prayed, “Let us ask the Lord for the grace to weep over our indifference, to weep over the cruelty in the world, in ourselves, and even in those who anonymously make socio-economic decisions that open the way to tragedies like this.” – Pope Francis, July 8, 2013 in Lampedusa

  • What causes me to live with this indifference?
  • What could I do to change this reality?

Resource: Pastoral de la movilidad humana (Peru)

Action:

  • Contact a public official about refugee or immigrant justice.
  • How do I welcome a new family in my neighborhood, work or Church?